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20131028
20131105
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English 27
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> essentially it comes down to two facts about u.s. foreign policy in the middle east - one, the u.s. is committed to maintaining the peace treaty between egypt and israel. it cannot end a relationship with egypt in order to maintain the peace treaty. that is where you see some of the material, some of the military parts that are being given to the military to help preserve the security in the sinai peninsula. there's the matter of enhancing the u.s.'s stature across the great e-middle east. it would -- greater middle east. it would not do for the barack obama situation to cut off all ties with a country with whom it has had a longstanding political relationship. one of points that john kerry is making whilst in cairo is that the interim government, backed by the military, can't exist inperpetuaty, it needs to get on with establishing elections for a democratic-elected parliament and needs to take the steps sooner rather than later. >> let's talk about the visit to cairo. we didn't know about it until he landed, which makes you think iraq, afghanistan - dangerous places. what are t
.s. can reconcile the democracy in egypt. >> it comes down to two facts about u.s. foreign policy in the middle east. >> one the u.s. is committed to maintaining the peace treaty between egypt and israel and it can simply not end a relationship with egypt in order to maintain that peace treaty. that is where you see the material or the military parts that are still being given to the military to help preserve the security in the sinai peninsula, for example. there is also the matter of trying to enhance the u.s.' stature across the middle east. it would not due for the obama administration to cut off all ties with the country with who it's had a long standing political and military relationship because of these political problems. >> with that said one. points secon secretary kerry isg while he is in cairo, this interm government cannot exist in perpetuity. it needs to get on with the business of constitutional reforms and establishing elections for a new democratically elected president and parliament. and it need to take on has to steps much soonerrather than later. >> let's tal
an impact on u.s. foreign policy, on the way it talks and discusses and not only that, collects information, and it's also having an impact in the fact that, you know, lots of people in europe, especially leaders, are not cutting the u.s. as much slack as they might have done in the past. partly, they're saying, because the u.s. under the obama administration, is backing off a lot of the burden sharing, a lot of the heavy lifting that traditionally the u.s. has done in support of its allies over the past. >> because of the fallout, bought of the anger amongst the world leaders, julian, do you think someone's head should roll over this? >> well, we're going to see what the administration does. i think two things to remember. president obama himself raised a lot of the expectations about the differences with how he would conduct national security operations and those resonated both here and around the world. so it might be that in the end, he tries to blame someone. he himself now by -- with this report coming out that he ordered this to stop, it's something of an admission this shouldn't be
friendship ith other countries. if you follow iraq's foreign policy, you would see that the iraqis think independently and not according to the interest of any others. we have a partnership an agreement with the united states. this is something some other countries do not like. that we like it, this is what matters. be believed to have a strong relation within the united states. if others do not agree, it is their problem. they cannot impose anything on the iraqis. if they want to be our friends our friendship does not impose on us being enemies of others. >> how do you respond to critics -- this is not coming from me, but a question from someone else -- say you are consolidating power and this has adversely affected iraq's democratic process? >> the constitution and ruling in iraq gives prerogative. this is something i state clearly. let me know when i act in an unconstitutional way. if i act in a way that is not acceptable to some of our partners, as long as i am committing to respecting the constitution and as long as i use my prerogative in a constitutional way, there should ot be a
states remains what he called the cornerstone of japan's foreign policy. >>> in the middle east, a leading egyptian satirist and television soviet to america's jon stewart yanked off the air. yousaf made fun of the leader. a huge cake adorned were the the image of the army chief. >>> tunisia barred from the davis cup. the international tins federation imposed the punishment after tunisian player was ordered not to play against another player. there is no room for prejudice in the sport. >>> and designated newborn to either male or female. that section of the birth certificate can be left blank. the idea, decide what to dop if the child is born with both male and female sex characteristics. estimates say that occurs in as many as 1 in 2,000 births. m for male, f for female or x, , for those calling themselves intersex. >>> and now back to that attack at l.a.x. yesterday. for more about its possible repurchase cushions joined from washington by rafi rhan, security expert and the former director of security a benghazi in tel aviv. the first thing most of asking this morning, what d
of conduct of foreign policy since u.s. revolutionary war times, since the beginning of history you have had pies. what is different is technology, the capability to listen in to everything. and i think that that is what the administration is dealing with is technology so different we'll have to think about new rules of the road. >> i was going to say in this question of running amuck being on auto pilot you used that borrowed, that ask what sect of state kerry said. you add this technological capability if it's running on auto pilot and people who are overseeing don't know what it's doing, then it has this control and overseers don't know what it's doing and one of the amazing things what nsa was doing with google and yahoo! scraping all of their data out of the area that ability does make it seem like the nsa has found new mothers for itself that the people who were supposed to other sees, supposed to keep this kelp del cat wall between safety and civil liberties they don't know what is going on. >> the mystery here is the between what john said they can do and what they actually are doin
is the embargo still in place? >> well, it's hard to think about more counter productive foreign policy than the u.s. embargo. here we have 180 plus nations in the united nations voting against a country who's supposedly the beacon of liberty around the world in favor of a ruthless brutal dictatorship because of the the embargo. i cannot think of a policy that has served the opposite purpose of the goal towards cuba. i mean, after 50 years of the embargo in place, cuba is not any closer to becoming a democracy than in 1960, so i think it's pretty clear that it is an utter failure. >> this is the 22nd year in a row the u.n. voted on this issue. last year, three voted in favor of the sufficient, this year only two, israel being the second. is the u.s. growing more and more isolated on this issue and what does it signal? >> the tiny island of paolo was the other country that voted last year in favor of the united states. i think the embargo is quite the useful tool for the cuban regime. look at what's going on. it helps the cuban regime to rally the entire world behind them and against the unit
. and finally, turn to what is the -- what do the implications of this an how we implement foreign policy. with that sort of an overarching on the topic i like to see us cover. i'm going it start with the first question on the threat we face and why we need -- feel we need security. if there are no benefits with e wouldn't have be having the discussion. with that, george, i would like to turn to you. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our security and -- it's changed, henry, i think a few relatively significant ways. first, it is a threat than it was ten to fifteen years ago. it's not necessarily aligned bay group by ideology and other driving factors which may be complaint about how we are conducting ourselves in their view. secondly, the threat seems to progress at time very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today perhaps in some obscure part of the world could in fact be on the doorstep tomorrow. lastly, it has significantly. they don't necessarily appear based on their actions and recent actions are indicators of that. that necess
-- on how to achieve a foreign- policy objective. in on personal cell phone calls, does that go too far? guest: our leaders need to apply a balancing test. they have to weigh the foreign intelligence game from such a sensitive axes, like you are saying, in particular intercept of a foreign leader's phone call. a foreign-policy flap would result if it was disclosed. you have to apply that balancing. i think judging from the newspapers that is what the white house is doing this week. they are reviewing the posture of the intelligence community on these collection priorities. are going to apply this test to see what makes sense for the country. appropriate?back guest: it is safe to say the snow back -- the snowden relation did -- revelation caused blowback. host: he was a game changer in all this, would you agree? caller: i think so because this is one of the greatest leaks and compromises in american intelligence in our history. it is the equivalent of giving the other team our playbook. going to be looking back on the snowden years for years to come, perhaps as a point when some of our c
are the implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. it serves as an overarching of the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face and why we need security. if there are no benefits, we do not need security. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our methods adaptive? >> it has changed in relatively significant ways. it is a far more diffuse threat than it was 10 or 15 years ago. it is not necessarily align to buy group, but principally by ideology and other driving fact there's, -- driving factors. secondly, the threat seems to progress at times very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today could be on our doorstep tomorrow. lastly, they do not necessarily appear based on their actions in recent actions are indicators of that. big and complex attacks are their goal or their aim to accomplish their objectives. relatively small in comparison attacks that are relatively simple to put together and execute seem to be a preference. they have the same tools we all have to communicate in a
on foreign policy he was pretty good, terrible on domestic policy. and so i, too, had to fight that public image. and i came out of it quite conflicted. >> host: nicole is in michigan city indiana and nicole, your are on booktv with kitty kelley. >> caller: thank you, ms. kelly. i'm really enjoying the program and i just admire you and i love your approach to writing unauthorized biographies. i'm an aspiring writer myself and i would like to know, how do you start your day, the whole process and starting her books. are you a morning ride, evening writer, what is your process? >> host: what kind of books are you writing? >> caller: well, it's a book on how to get married, because there's a lot of single women, how to get married. [laughter] >> guest: that would be a best seller. >> caller: that's what i'm hoping. and i look at successful women also and how they met their spouses. that i talk to women every day that are in marriages and say, no, how did you major husband. so i'm doing research and also drawing upon my own experience. so how do you start your writing day in which the process
comment on our foreign policy by former vice president dick cheney. listen to this. >> i think our friend no longer count on us, no longer trust us and our adversaries don't fear us. that is the cornerstone and base of u.s. ability and influence. if we're not heavily involved there, if we turned our back on the region, if we have a president who believes we overreacted to the terrorism attacks on 9/11, i think the saudis, the emiratis, egyptians, many in that part of the world no longer have confidence in the united states. martha: does this president lack confidence or even respect to some extent from some of these world leaders and is that part of the reason that we're seeing this kind of outrage about all this? >> by all accounts president obama does not have close personal relationships with foreign leaders the way reagan did with thatcher or bill clinton did with tony blair or president bush with angela merkel for that matter or with sarkozy. in the middle east he had very inconsistent policy for instance with syria. he basically told france by all accounts that we were going to atta
in broad daylight. >>> president obama is hearing tough new criticism of his foreign policy. in an interview yesterday former vice president dick cheney said he doesn't trust the president -- trust the president to stand behind israel and keep nuclear weapons out of iran. >> you don't believe he has the best interests of the united states in terms of our national security in the middle east? >> i don't believe he does. >> you don't believe his word can be trusted? >> correct. >> that's a serious question. >> it certainly is. >> to say that to the president of the united states. >> that's right. >> in a democratic country. >> but i think this president is doing enormous damage to our standing, to our capacity to influence events. we are rapidly eroding our ability to have any impact on what's going on in the middle east. the last time we walked away from afghanistan, for example, back in the '80s, we'd been there heavily involved supporting the move against the soviets but then we turned around after the soviets departed. they got a civil war and osa
, that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states, to our conduct, our foreign policy, to defense matters, to economic matters, and i am a strong supporter of it. >> the director of national intelligence james clapper announced overnight he is declassifying a trove of documents about the collection under the foreign intelligence surveillance acts, or first ssa. later today, clapper and the head of the nsa, keith alexen direction will be testify on the hill about that program. you can be sure they're going to be getting questions about spying overseas, how far it should go and what limits the administration is considering placing on it now. >> this is a huge story, especially in europe. jim sciutto, thank you very much. >>> republican senator lindsey graham turning up the heat on the obama administration for its handling of last year's benghazi rror attack and its aftermath. the outspoken critic of the administration is threatening to block all presidential nomination, before the senate until survivors of that attack testify before congress. take a listen to graham on f
in just one month. how this could affect u.s. foreign policy on fighting terrorism and is other key issues, we expect to hear more on the white house news conference scheduled to begin in 90 minutes kyla campbell ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and diane feinstein plans to give continued authority. she heads the senate select committee on intelligence. they are drafting legislation to put restrictions on the nsa phone records program. the legislation would allow the nsa to continue gathering records listing the numbers, time and duration of all u.s. telephone calls but not their content the. >>> time is 8:15. well, this week marks the first anniversary of superstorm sandy. one of the nation's worst natural disaster. this morning historic ellis island will reopen for the first time since that big storm slammed into new york harbor. superstorm sandy ravaged the island, left it without power for several months. the clean up work is far from over despite the reopening today. ellis island is best known as you know for ushering millions of immigrants into the united states over the years. now, a lot oa
, the difference is the president was awful lucky we had an affordable care act all week because of the foreign policy and here israel dropping bombs in syria on missiles that were sort of underreported was to me a pretty big deal. i mean, we have that problem that's still there. we have the middle east and an i iranian problem and did drop off the screen. i thought that was very important. >> what about obama care? you were telling us earlier repeal and replace with what, right? >> it is not just repeal and replace and go back to vermont. i don't agree with anything but they're doing something different and republicans have to get into exactly what they think it's resetting obama care, redoing it. that's still for another day. >> thank you so much. christine, kayton, david, all thank you so much. thank you for watching. i'm richard lui. i'll see you tomorrow right back here at 3:00 p.m. eastern time but first "disrupt with karen finney." [ male announcer ] this is claira. to prove to you that aleve is the better choice for her, she's agreed to give it up. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll
the domain of foreign policy, whether the central government is on board because the prime minister of pakistan is going to be briefed by his cabinet in the next few hours and is going to be some sort of outcome from that particular meeting with the prime minister later tonight. >> we will continue to follow that, and thank you. elections turn violent sunday in parts of kosovo and masked men burst in throwing tear gas and smashing ballot boxes and the police were across the city and the first time they are voting in local elections since they declared independence in 2008. when the storm season calms and dangerous exit begins and 50 people are missing after a boat capsized and eight people were rescued and carrying muslims and they are a muslim minority in myanmar and persecuted and 200 people have been killed in violence and hundreds in camps and they tried to flee the country. east of the bay another boat accident killed at least six tourists, a boat capsized and it was over crowded and took on water and sank. the capacity is 150 but there have been more than 200 on board. witness
've abandoned them, as we have done egypt. it's an interesting foreign policy we're witnessing. lieutenant colonel allen west who fights for us, worked for us in washington and now a fox news contributor, thanks so much. >> thanks for having me, brian. >> next up, hey, parents, do your kids love mac and cheese? there is big changes coming and you need to know about it because they're going to eat it anyway. reality show husband bill rancic is running into the studio right now, he'll be in last place of the new york city marathon. wisest kid? we need a new recipe. let us consult the scroll of infinite deliciousness. perfect. [ wisest kid ] campbell's has the recipes kids love. so good! [ wisest kid ] at campbellskitchen.com. [ gong ] m'm! m'm! good! female narrator: the mattress price wars are ending soon the mattress price wars are ending soon at sleep train. we've challenged the manufacturers to offer even lower prices. now it's posturepedic versus beautyrest with big savings of up to $400 off. serta icomfort and tempur-pedic go head-to-head with three years' interest-free financing, plus
met with egy egypt's foreign minister and didn't extend -- because it's quote policy. kerry is the highest level official to visit since morsey's ou ouster. his trial begins tomorrow. >>> after nsa edward snowden met with a german lawmaker in moscow he reportedly said he is willing to testify. he will go to nogermany as longs that country doesn't send him to the us. he said in a manifesto today that he feels justified in spilling intelligence secrets. the german lawmaker who met edward snowden said the confessed leaker wants to testify in front of congress. >> he stressed that he is ready to come before the german parliament to testify and that he would rather go before the pairliment and put the facts on the table. >> she says he is making his own decisions and is not being manipulated by the russians. >> despite the police state surveillance state we have been turning into. i think he would love to come back some day if the conditions plitly were different. >> nsa chief alexander, the turmoil now giving him second thoughts on whether spying on al lies like german chancello
that these programs and policies are are not trying to trying to sweepingly go after americans and look at their private communications. foreign intelligence coming in. and i trust them. and i think the american people should trust them. >> foreign intelligence court, right? the problem is yahoo and google aren't foreign, a lot of user accounts are right here in america. they are data mining it. that's what the "the washington post" found out. my point is in order to do that you need probable cause and they are not doing that first. >> or you can have a special presidential directive which they do have in certain cases. look, eric, at the end of the day. >> but that's a problem. that's my problem. a special presidential directive. it's like the executive order pen. here is where the right is. the right is in the constitution. he by passing the constitution. >> there is no question about that. >> go ahead. >> we can't have a system of government where republicans only trust the republicans. and the democrats on trust the democrats. we have to rely on congressional oversight. this is a ve
in the final conference report. i believe the conference should maintain our current sugar policy to protect american jobs. as the ranking member of the house and foreign affairs committee, our system for delivering aid abroad is outdates from the 1950s, and chairman royce agrees with me. it takes far too long to get food aid to starving people, wastes tens of millions of taxpayer dollars, and harms agricultural markets in the countries we're trying to help. in these times of budget belt tightening, we need a better way to distribute aid, and the provisions in three are modest, common sense reforms, that help the u.s. save more lives with our overseased food assistance. while asupport all the food aid reform included in the senate bill, i'm particularly supportive of section 3008 which includes flexibility in choosing between cash based resources or commodities thereby reducing reliance on the wasteful practice of monsterrization. this allows food aid programs to include up to 20% cash funding which allows the u.s. to use the most appropriate tools to respond to emergencies, incoming local a
foreign intelligence services will try to monitor them. they do to so create knowledge about the way policy makers make decisions and so forth. so i think some of that stuff is a little bit overblown on their part but we should always review our intelligence programs and make sure they're not abused and make sure they're used in the most effective ways. jenna: always great to have you on the program. we always cover a loft ground and we appreciate it. thank you. much more on the big story coming up in a moment jon: a stunning new report from the centers for disease control now claiming that even perfectly healthy children are dying from flu complications. let's talk about it with a board certified e.r. physician and l.s.u. shreveport adjunct assistant professor. you always hear the warnings that the elderly and the very young should get the flu shots because they're the most susceptible but there are 7-year-old, 8-year-old children who die and were otherwise healthy. >> it was a little alarming. the c.d.c. came out with a study where they looked over the last few years and i think if
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)